PIETER MONDRIAAN

TYROWN VINCENT’S
PIETER MONDRIAAN
TYROWN VINCENT’S
NEW YORK CITY I
Mondrian was captivated on seeing the city of New York in 1940. Its bright, geometric, colorful design was a direct reflection of his own research. There, he came to discover jazz and boogie-woogie, which also made a strong impression on the artist.

This source of inspiration can be seen in a number of works, such as Broadway Boogie-Woogie and New York City I, which capture careful attention to rhythm.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1942
119.3×114.2 cm (47×45 in)
Composition 10
Many of his paintings contained the basic elements of an interlocking grid of black lines and blocks of the three primary colors. Although the elements were few, he changed the structure of each of the elements in such a way that he was able to create a different aesthetic from each.

It was in this later period of his work that Mondrian work until his hands blistered or he made himself cry. During this time, he was also rearranging and painting his Manhattan studio apartment in a similar grid and block pattern, which he changed and re-painted upon completion off certain canvases or projects.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1939–1942
79.5×73 cm (31.3×28.7 in)
NEW YORK CITY I
Mondrian was captivated on seeing the city of New York in 1940. Its bright, geometric, colorful design was a direct reflection of his own research. There, he came to discover jazz and boogie-woogie, which also made a strong impression on the artist.

This source of inspiration can be seen in a number of works, such as Broadway Boogie-Woogie and New York City I, which capture careful attention to rhythm.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1942
119.3×114.2 cm (47×45 in)
Composition 10
Many of his paintings contained the basic elements of an interlocking grid of black lines and blocks of the three primary colors. Although the elements were few, he changed the structure of each of the elements in such a way that he was able to create a different aesthetic from each.

It was in this later period of his work that Mondrian work until his hands blistered or he made himself cry. During this time, he was also rearranging and painting his Manhattan studio apartment in a similar grid and block pattern, which he changed and re-painted upon completion off certain canvases or projects.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1939–1942
79.5×73 cm (31.3×28.7 in)
Composition with Red, Blue and Yellow
It is well-known work of art, Mondrian contributes to the abstract visual language in a large way despite using a relatively small canvas. Thick, black brushwork defines the borders of the different geometric figures.

Comparably, the black brushwork on the canvas is minimal but it is masterfully applied to become one of the defining features of the work.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil and paper on canvas
1929
59.5×59.5 cm (23.4×23.4 in)
Tableau I
Tableau no. 1 clearly shows the influence of analytical cubism. In this, an object or figure is dissected, broken into fragments and converted into a complex structure. The composition is built up from the middle and the shapes become blurred towards the edges. Tableau no. 1 has an underdrawing of a tree, but this motif is barely recognizable.

Mondriaan dissects his subject into countless segments. This creates a lively structure of horizontal and vertical, straight and slightly curved lines and grey and ochre surfaces. In this painting and in other works from the same year, Mondriaan takes his first steps towards ‘the unchanging pure reality behind the changeable forms of nature’.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas

1913

96×64 cm (37.8×25.2 in)
Composition with Red, Blue and Yellow
It is well-known work of art, Mondrian contributes to the abstract visual language in a large way despite using a relatively small canvas. Thick, black brushwork defines the borders of the different geometric figures.

Comparably, the black brushwork on the canvas is minimal but it is masterfully applied to become one of the defining features of the work.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil and paper on canvas
1929
59.5×59.5 cm (23.4×23.4 in)
Tableau I
Tableau no. 1 clearly shows the influence of analytical cubism. In this, an object or figure is dissected, broken into fragments and converted into a complex structure. The composition is built up from the middle and the shapes become blurred towards the edges. Tableau no. 1 has an underdrawing of a tree, but this motif is barely recognizable.

Mondriaan dissects his subject into countless segments. This creates a lively structure of horizontal and vertical, straight and slightly curved lines and grey and ochre surfaces. In this painting and in other works from the same year, Mondriaan takes his first steps towards ‘the unchanging pure reality behind the changeable forms of nature’.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas

1913

96×64 cm (37.8×25.2 in)
Every true artist has been inspired more by the beauty of lines and color and the relationships between them than by the concrete subject of the picture.
Piet Mondrian
7 March 1872 ­— 1 February 1944
Every true artist has been inspired more by the beauty of lines and color and the relationships between them than by the concrete subject of the picture.
Piet Mondrian
7 March 1872 ­— 1 February 1944
ON EXHIBITIONS AND OTHER QUESTIONS
ON EXHIBITIONS AND OTHER QUESTIONS