Gustav Klimt

TYROWN VINCENT’S
GUSTAV KLIMT
TYROWN VINCENT’S
THE KISS
The Kiss (in German Der Kuss) is an oil-on-canvas painting with added gold leaf, silver and platinum. It was painted at some point in 1907 and 1908, during the height of what scholars call his «Golden Period».
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1908­–1909
180×180 cm (70.9×70.9 in)
Adele Bloch-Bauer
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (also called The Lady in Gold or The Woman in Gold) was commissioned by the sitter's husband, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, a Jewish banker and sugar producer.

The portrait is the final and most fully representative work of Klimt's golden phase. It was the first of two depictions of Adele by Klimt—the second was completed in 1912.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil, silver and gold on canvas
1903­–1907
138×138 cm (54×54 in)
THE KISS
The Kiss (in German Der Kuss) is an oil-on-canvas painting with added gold leaf, silver and platinum. It was painted at some point in 1907 and 1908, during the height of what scholars call his «Golden Period».
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1908­–1909
180×180 cm (70.9×70.9 in)
Adele Bloch-Bauer
Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I (also called The Lady in Gold or The Woman in Gold) was commissioned by the sitter's husband, Ferdinand Bloch-Bauer, a Jewish banker and sugar producer.

The portrait is the final and most fully representative work of Klimt's golden phase. It was the first of two depictions of Adele by Klimt—the second was completed in 1912.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil, silver and gold on canvas
1903­–1907
138×138 cm (54×54 in)
Judith and the Head of Holofernes
Judith and the Head of Holofernes depicts the biblical figure Judith holding the head of Holofernes after beheading him. The beheading and its aftermath have been commonly portrayed in art since the Renaissance, and Klimt himself would paint a second work depicting the subject in 1909.

Klimt deliberately ignores any narrative reference whatsoever and concentrates his pictorial rendering solely on to Judith, so much so that he cuts off Holofernes' head at the right margin.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1901
84×42 cm (33×17 in)
Jurisprudence
Even though the painting is a classic piece of Klimt's work, the darker emotion and philosophy behind the prize shows a different feel than many of his contemporaries of the time.

The piece will never be displayed in the University of Vienna as it is seen as a pornographic piece that exploits the female body in the barbaric form as it connects with sea creatures. Similar pieces such as Medicine are seem to be excessively sexual and were not used within the Great Hall.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1903­–1907
430×300 cm (169.3×118.1 in)
Judith and the Head of Holofernes
Judith and the Head of Holofernes depicts the biblical figure Judith holding the head of Holofernes after beheading him. The beheading and its aftermath have been commonly portrayed in art since the Renaissance, and Klimt himself would paint a second work depicting the subject in 1909.

Klimt deliberately ignores any narrative reference whatsoever and concentrates his pictorial rendering solely on to Judith, so much so that he cuts off Holofernes' head at the right margin.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1901
84×42 cm (33×17 in)
Jurisprudence
Even though the painting is a classic piece of Klimt's work, the darker emotion and philosophy behind the prize shows a different feel than many of his contemporaries of the time.

The piece will never be displayed in the University of Vienna as it is seen as a pornographic piece that exploits the female body in the barbaric form as it connects with sea creatures. Similar pieces such as Medicine are seem to be excessively sexual and were not used within the Great Hall.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1903­–1907
430×300 cm (169.3×118.1 in)
AVENUE IN SCHLOSS KAMMER PARK
While Klimt's first landscapes date from the early 1880s, it was not until the late 1890s that he turned consistently to landscape subjects, during summer vacations spent in the picturesque Salzkammergut, outside the city of Salzburg.

Landscape painting enabled him to experiment, free from the pressure of commissioned work and the distractions of the metropolis.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1912
110×110 cm (43.3×43.3 in)
Adele Bloch-Bauer
Fritza Riedler was one of Gustav Klimt’s early portraits. The wife of the Austrian mechanical engineer Alois Riedler, Fritza embodies the wealth and status of a growing Viennese middle class, in a pale eau de Nil dress and backed by a ‘secular halo’ of stained glass.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil, silver and gold on canvas
1906
152×134 cm (59.8×52.8 in)
GIRLFRIENDS OR TWO WOMEN FRIENDS
Particularly in his late artwork, Gustav Klimt employs homosexual love. In this Girlfriends painting, the figures of the women seem to be vanishing. The background mixes in an adorned ornamental area.

Gustav Klimt had changed traditional symbols with overly metaphorical sensuality, for instance, in the Girlfriends; in fact this made his artwork more upsetting and shocking. The public protest that came from different political, religious and artistic gatherings was extreme.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1916–1917
99×99 cm (39×39 in)
AVENUE IN SCHLOSS KAMMER PARK
While Klimt's first landscapes date from the early 1880s, it was not until the late 1890s that he turned consistently to landscape subjects, during summer vacations spent in the picturesque Salzkammergut, outside the city of Salzburg.

Landscape painting enabled him to experiment, free from the pressure of commissioned work and the distractions of the metropolis.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1912
110×110 cm (43.3×43.3 in)
Adele Bloch-Bauer
Fritza Riedler was one of Gustav Klimt’s early portraits. The wife of the Austrian mechanical engineer Alois Riedler, Fritza embodies the wealth and status of a growing Viennese middle class, in a pale eau de Nil dress and backed by a ‘secular halo’ of stained glass.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil, silver and gold on canvas
1906
152×134 cm (59.8×52.8 in)
GIRLFRIENDS OR TWO WOMEN FRIENDS
Particularly in his late artwork, Gustav Klimt employs homosexual love. In this Girlfriends painting, the figures of the women seem to be vanishing. The background mixes in an adorned ornamental area.

Gustav Klimt had changed traditional symbols with overly metaphorical sensuality, for instance, in the Girlfriends; in fact this made his artwork more upsetting and shocking. The public protest that came from different political, religious and artistic gatherings was extreme.
Type
Year
Sizes
Oil on canvas
1916–1917
99×99 cm (39×39 in)
Whoever wants to know something about me, they should look attentively at my pictures and there seek to recognise what I am and what I want.
Gustav Klimt
July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918
Whoever wants to know something about me, they should look attentively at my pictures and there seek to recognise what I am and what I want.
Gustav Klimt
July 14, 1862 – February 6, 1918